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                                                                         Your Position: Home > Articles > LED News > Perspective on LED Market on 2012

Perspective on LED Market on 2012

LED inside / 2011-10-11

 According to LED inside, market for LED light bulbs is estimated to exceed to exceed $3 billion by 2012, almost quadrupling from that of 2009, an outstanding growth for LED light bulbs. Market value for a wide variety of LED lighting applications are estimated at $2.2 billion in 2011, an approximate 23% annual growth rate compared to $1.8 billion in 2010. The majority of growth is contributed from commercial and architectural lighting. In terms of the general lighting market, the price difference between LEDs used in indoor lighting and traditional lamps is still significant, hindering the willingness of consumers to switch.


Global climate change has put great pressure on government, reducing the emission of CO2 has become an emergency to government around the world. Actions have been implemented to renewable energy and carbon reduction. Green economy has stimulated the application of new lighting technology.
Japan, a market with large LED demands is an iconic example. The Japanese government imposed a subsidy called “eco-point” aiming to encourage the application of energy-efficient household appliances. The outcome has been successful in 2009 and 2010.The project achieved its success by advocating buying energy-saving appliance can be used to exchange free LED bulbs, which indirectly stimulates the large application of LEDs.

More and more countries have grant subsidies for commercial and household applications of energy-efficient appliances. In fact, many countries are trying to ban incandescent bulbs by 2012. The adoption of LEDs is estimated to dramatically increase by 2012. And many governments are trying to standardize the requirement of LED bulbs manufacture. 

Here is a brief of every country government’s requirement.

Thailand: encouraging the replacement since 2007.

Portugal: the government has increased the tax of imported incandescent lights by EUR 0.5.

Switzerland: the government has forbidden selling the type F and G bulbs with low luminous efficacies, which included a few kinds of incandescent lights.

Brazil: the government has forbidden the use of incandescent lights since January, 2010.

United Kingdom: the government has forbidden the use of incandescent lights since 2011.

Canada: the government will forbid selling incandescent lights starting from 2012.
India: the government plans to replace 400 million incandescent light bulbs with energy-saving lights by the end of 2012.

Australia: forbidden importing and selling incandescent lights from 2008 to 2009.

Ireland: the government has forbidden selling incandescent lights with low luminous efficacies since 2009.

Philippines: the government forbade the use of incandescent.

Japan: the government will forbid the use of incandescent bulbs in 2012.

South Korea: the government will forbid the use of incandescent bulbs starting from 2013.

United States: the government will complete forbid the use of incandescent bulbs from 2010 to 2012.

Malaysia: the government will forbid the manufacture, import, selling of incandescent from January 2014.

European Union: it started forbidding the use of 100W incandescent lights(type C) since 2009, it started forbidding the use of 65W incandescent light bulbs since 2010 and will forbid selling 60W incandescent light bulbs since Sep., 2011;it will forbid selling 40W and 25W incandescent light bulbs since Sep. 2012 and only light bulbs with luminous efficacies higher than that of type D light bulb are allowed to be sold. EU plans to fully replace incandescent light bulbs by 2015 and only light bulbs with luminous efficacies higher than that fo type B light bulb are allowed to be sold by 2016.

 
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